Little Melton Primary School Email: office@littlemelton.norfolk.sch.uk Home page

Pupil Premium Strategy

This Strategy is reviewed with the Governor responsible for ‘Disadvantaged Children’ at the end of each academic year. 

Eligible pupils at the school face a range of different barriers to educational achievement. These vary widely in individual cases but can include: lack of access to educational resources, lack of access to cultural opportunities, lack of suitable equipment, broken family structures, low parental engagement, trauma, housing issues, diet and special educational needs and disabilities.

Pupil Premium Funding 2019-20 PP Strategy-Sept19

Pupil Premium Funding 2018-19 Outcomes (see below)

Funding

Grant received 2018/19 £25,040

18 children

(based on January 2018 census)

Pupils

  • September’2018: 18 PP children (15.3 % of school population).
  • The 18 children are all FSM (including 3 ‘Ever 6’ and 1 with additional former LAC funding), apart from 1 child from a Service Family.

Audit of needs & pupil voice:

 

 

 

Tracking of impact:

 

To shape spending priorities we:

  • Carry out an audit of the individual needs of the children by all staff.
  • Use the results of an ‘Assertive mentoring’ half-termly tracking of a range of indicators.
  • A pupil voice questionnaire
  • Documents such as the Sutton Trust Education Endowment Foundation Toolkit  for schools were used as part of the analysis, as well as looking at how other schools were using this grant.
  • Identified barriers to progress for each child are hence established and used to inform provision.

To measure impact we use a regular termly analysis. This includes:

  • % of disadvantaged children on track to make and/or exceed expected progress at each Key Stage.
  • Tracking of behaviour and attitudes to learning for all PP children through the Learning Mentor
  • Termly Pupil Progress Meetings include specific discussion of PP children
  • Monthly analysis of attendance and punctuality data by Headteacher
Staffing provision: The funding will be spent on a combination of staffing, resources and interventions.

  • Additional HLTA employed (full time) with specific responsibility for working with PP children across all classrooms.
  • Additional TA hours provided for ‘learning mentor’ role with PP children
  • Additional TA hours provided to support  Homework club after school
  • External Speech & Language support
Interventions & Resources:
  • Pupil Premium children have benefited from:Wave 3 Maths, Catch up Numeracy Booster 1:1 Maths groups Booster 1:1 Reading groups Pupil Premium Mentor Homework club‘Time for You’ intervention Counselling 1:1 Thrive
  • Cultural visits (driven by identified PP need but involving larger groups)
  • Talk Boost, 1st Number, ICT based resources eg Nessy
  • E-learning opportunities in Homework club (from our developing ‘E-learning portfolio)
  • Kindles
  • They have each received interventions appropriate to their identified needs.
  • Subsidised places at after school clubs and on educational visits and equipment
  • Additional swimming sessions
  • Speech and Language Interventions
  • Staff training
Spending 2017-18
  • £23,220
  • Currently unallocated: £1,820

Results:

Impact: July 2019 (end of Summer Term) analysis:

  • At the end of Key Stage 2  (2 children) 100% of children receiving PP funding achieved the expected standard in Maths and 50% in Reading and Writing. Fifty percent of the children also achieved ‘Greater Depth’ standard in writing.
  • Provisional data suggests that mean progress for the PP children in Y6 was Reading +1.5 (above average), Writing + 6.5 (well above average), Maths + 5.7 (well above average).
  • Across the rest of Key Stage 2 (Y3-5) End of term data suggests that for the 12 children expected progress+:Maths: 92%  Reading: 92% Writing: 84%
  • At the end of Key Stage 1 (Y1-2) the number of pupils in receipt of disadvantaged funding was too small to publish results without identifying the children involved. Progress data across Y1-2 suggests that the vast majority of the children are making at least expected progress in reading, writing and maths.
  • At the end of Early Years, progress data suggests that underlying progress was good from widely different starting points.

Impact: July 2018 (end of Summer Term) analysis:

  • At the end of Key Stage 2 100% of children receiving PP funding achieved the expected standard in Reading, Writing and Maths. 33% of children also achieved ‘Greater Depth’ standard in Reading.
  • Provisional data suggests that mean progress for the non-mobile children in Y6 was above average (+1.4) in reading, well above average (+3.0) in Maths and average (-0.3) in writing.
  • Across the rest of Key Stage 2 (Y3-5) End of term data suggests that 91% of children are making expected or better than expected progress in reading, writing and maths. Attainment data suggests  that 64% are working at nationally expected levels in reading and 55% in writing and maths. (There is a very high coincidence of SEND (70%) in this group)
  • At the end of Key Stage 1 (Y1-2) the number of pupils in receipt of disadvantaged funding was too small to publish results without identifying the children involved. Progress data across Y1-2 suggests that all of the children are making at least expected progress in reading, writing and maths.
  • At the end of Early Years the number of pupils in receipt of disadvantaged funding was too small to publish results without identifying the children involved. Progress data across Early years however suggests that a high proportion of the children made rapid progress from their starting points in both prime and specific areas of learning.
Impact: July 2017 (end of Summer Term) analysis:

  • At the end of KS2 (Y6), the number of pupils in receipt of disadvantaged funding was too small to publish results without identifying the children involved.
  • Across KS2 (Y3-6), internal tracking data suggests that the vast majority of disadvantaged children are making expected or better than expected progress.  Current projections suggest that the % of disadvantaged children on track to achieve the national ‘expected standard’ at the end of KS2 is reading: 63%; writing: 63% and maths 63% (8 children).
  • Across and at the end of KS1 (Y1-2), the very small group of disadvantaged children had all made at least expected progress from their different starting points.
  • At the end of Foundation stage (YR), the progress was excellent for the extremely small number of disadvantaged children in the cohort.  All achieved a ‘Good Level of Development’.
Impact: July 2016 (end of Summer Term) analysis:

  • At the end of KS2 (Y6), disadvantaged children made value added progress of 7.1 reading, 10.2 writing and 5.4 maths.  This is well above the national average for all children.
  • Across KS2 (Y3-5), internal tracking data suggests that the vast majority of disadvantaged children are making expected or better than expected progress.  Current projections suggest that the % of disadvantaged children on track to achieve the national ‘expected standard’ at the end of KS2 is reading: 83%; writing: 68% and maths 68% (6 children).
  • Across and at the end of KS1 (Y1-2), the very small group of disadvantaged children had all made at least expected progress from their different starting points.
  • At the end of Foundation stage (YR), the progress was excellent for the extremely small number of disadvantaged children in the cohort particularly in ‘prime’ areas.
Impact: July 2015 (end of Summer Term) analysis indicates:

  • At the end of KS2, disadvantaged children made an average points gain >14.3 in maths, reading and writing for the time they were at the school. This was slightly higher on average than the rest of the cohort. 100% made at least expected progress (2 levels). 75% achieved at level 4 or above in Maths and Reading.
  • At the end of KS1, disadvantaged children made progress that was better than Ofsted (July’15) definitions of ‘expected progress’ in Maths, Reading and writing, narrowing the attainment gap from EYFS baseline and end of EYFS. 100% of PP Year 2 children attained at least a level 2 in Maths and Reading, and only 1 PP child did not attain at least a level 2 in Reading
  • Current tracking of disadvantaged children without ‘levels’ suggests that at KS2 89% and at KS1 100% of children are on track to reach end of key stage outcomes which indicate good or better progress from the previous key stage.